Long Beach saloon's 100-year-old peanut roaster is still cooking.

Steve Harvey

It's like something out of an old Rube Goldberg cartoon, a wacky contraption outfitted with various-sized wheels, leather belts and cross-bars, as well as a catcher bin, a trap door and a 1-hp motor.

The 100-year-old peanut roaster sits in the backroom of Joe Jost's saloon in Long Beach, where it might be mistaken for nothing more than a colorful piece of decor, except the darn thing still works. It turns out 400 pounds of unsalted goobers a week.

"We have people come in for the first time, and they don't know what it is," said owner Ken Buck, grandson of founder Joe Jost. "They ask if it's a popcorn-maker. Or they think it's the water heater."

"Some people say it smells like peanut butter cookies," said his wife, Cathleen, who handles some of the roasting chores.

The antique fits right in at Jost's, an 84-year-old saloon that venerates the past with such old-time touches as brass foot rails, wooden booths, deer heads, a wooden telephone booth that has no telephone and a men's room with a trough.

There's also an ancient barber's sink behind the bar from the early days when Jost offered sandwiches, beer and haircuts. Eventually, health authorities told him they "didn't want him serving alcohol and shaving people with a straight-edge razor," Cathleen Buck said.

Out went the barber chairs, comfortable as they were.

The older Jost customers like things the way they are. They raised a small ruckus, for example, when Ken Buck stopped serving Pabst Blue Ribbon beer. But when he purchased the peanut roaster two decades ago, that was one change "no one griped about," he said.

Truth be told, Buck had a few reservations about the idea.

"He was afraid that people would throw the shells all over the floor," Cathleen Buck said. But even the messiest male patrons have been trained by bartenders to deposit their shells in small discard boxes with surprising regularity.

The belt-driven roaster itself has gone through some changes. It was originally a coffee roaster, proud product of the Milwaukee Gas and Stove Co., when it went into operation in 1907 at W.H. Marmion's general store in Long Beach.

But after World War I, great-grandson Bill Marmion said, "vacuum-packed coffee began to be prevalent. You could go to a store and buy it more cheaply. So he converted it into a peanut roaster."

Oddly enough, the machine wound up at Jost's because of a transient with a sweet tooth.

A young man broke into Marmion's in 1989, stole some gum balls and set the place on fire, unaware that it was a hangout for cops. Police found the intruder a couple of days later, with gum balls still in his pocket.

"There were very few officers who didn't know what we sold at the store," Bill Marmion said. "They knew the gum balls came from us."

But Bill's mother, Ruth, decided it was time to shut down the business.

The Marmions knew Buck and thought that Jost's would make a good home for their roaster. Buck sheathed it in copper and replaced the belts and some other parts.

To keep alive its connection with the past, he placed a weathered sign above it that proclaims, "Marmion Co./Spices/Peanuts."

"I go in there and get a free peanut once in a while," Bill Marmion said with a smile.

He can recognize the taste because Jost's uses the same type of peanut that Marmion's favored: Virginia-grade, jumbo size and never soaked in brine.

After all these years, the roaster can be crotchety.

"The machine has a mind of its own," Cathleen Buck said. "You have to make friends with the machine."

Roasting can take anywhere from 45 minutes to an hour because the roaster has no temperature gauge and the gas burners sometimes have to be adjusted. She can usually tell when a batch is ready by the golden color of the contents and the taste of a sample.

"I'm used to handling hot peanuts," she said. "Sometimes I'll hand one right out of the roaster to someone, and they'll let out a little scream. My hands are like oven gloves."

She paused.

"It's a funny thing," she quipped. "I graduated magna cum laude. And I've become a peanut lady."

History, Los Angeles County

Joe Jost's 

Peanuts and sausage and beer, oh my!
Joe Jost's of Long Beach, featured in last Sunday's Los Angeles Times (ok, it was their peanut roaster that was the star of the article) has redone their own website and it's too cool for me to describe. They even have a keg cam, so you can see that your beer is chilling properly. Go see, but turn down your speaker volume if you're at work.

I read somewhere that this was the place that Kevin Costner took Whitney Houston to in The Bodyguard. It was definitely in Win a Date with Tad Hamilton, Gone in 60 Seconds (the Nicholas Cage version), and a few beer commercials.

There really was a Joe Jost, too. Read about him on the website; his grandson still runs the place. I've got a sudden craving for liverwurst . . .

Joe Jost's Official Website

Interview with Ken Buck by Go Long Beach!

Joe Jost's, one of the oldest pubs in Long Beach was founded in 1924 by my grandfather. Joe Jost's is a Long Beach institution and one of the oldest continually operated taverns west of the Mississippi River. In fact, take a moment to learn more about the real Joe Jost here.

Joe Jost's is one of the best sports bars and dive bars in Long Beach. With world famous T-Shirts and a history of serving up the coldest beer, tastiest "Joe's Special" sandwiches, pickled eggs and fresh roasted peanuts, you will enjoy the warmest atmosphere of any tavern in the United States.

Click here to see how many millions we've actually served ….AND COUNTING!

Read more: Joe Jost's Official Website

Joe Jost the Man

Joe Jost

People often ask if there was a real Joe Jost that founded our celebrated tavern.

Yes, Joe was a real man who remains a part of the folklore of Long Beach. Meanwhile, Joe Jost’s remains a family business, with his grandson Ken now running the show.

So who was Joe?
What was he really like?
How did he make Joe Jost’s the landmark it is today?

Back around our 70th anniversary in 1994, Ken’s wife Cathleen wrote a great article about Joe, his life and his legacy, that we think answers all those questions and more. Keep reading to find out more about Joe Jost the man.

 

  


 Who Would It Be?

Three years ago I joined the Rancho Los Cerritos School Docent Program to teach California history to fourth graders. Volunteers conduct four-part tours by playing real or fictitious characters in a make-believe 1878 setting.

During our eight-week training session, each morning usually began with an icebreaker question. One day the question posed was, "If you could spend half an hour and have a cup of tea with someone who is no longer living, a famous person or a family member, who would that person be?"

Fellow trainees and docents stood up and rattled off well known historical and flamboyant figures such as Queen Victoria and Marco Polo. As my turn quickly approached, all I could think of was, “Who am I going to choose?”

Then, in an instant, the name came to me. I jumped up and said: "It would be Joe Jost; he was my husband’s grandfather. I’ve heard so much about him, both true and untrue, that I wish I could have met him." He was a man’s man, yet sensitive and a genuine humanitarian. Unfortunately, he died 19 years ago.

Joe Jost's is still considered by many to be a Long Beach landmark, the old-time, no-frills eatery and pool hall endures, much unchanged.

To commemorate this occasion I have been researching Joe Jost’s life. So what was he really like, this man who took up snow skiing at 65 years old and conquered dirt bike riding at 75? Though he’s gone, I see his spirit of adventure, confidence, self reliance and sincere disposition living in other family members.

Strange how some Americans clamor for role models to admire. They look to athletic heroes and movie stars, yet fail to consider the value of assimilating the positive qualities of their own relatives. Remember the old saying you can pick your friends but not your family? Well, after my investigation, Joe would have served as a terrific role model for any age group and many of us would have selected him as a family member.

Joe was born in a small Hungarian town called Istranfold, now in Yugoslavia. At the young age of 12 he was given a choice of either becoming a priest or getting a job. Off he went to live with an uncle in a nearby village to serve a four-year apprenticeship as a barber.

You see, Joe had a dream of his own. Fascinated by the books he had read about the United States, he romanticized about journeying to America. In those days, I’m told that you had to have a skill or trade before coming to the U.S. This being a part of his plan at the age of 16, he sailed a steamer that landed in New York Harbor. He never forgot the moment he first gazed upon the Statue of Liberty, a memory he kept close to his heart for his entire lifetime.

Accompanying Joe was a new found friend, also named Joe, from his uncle’s barber shop; family members later call him “Uncle JoJo”. Uncle JoJo, somewhat brokenhearted, was lured by Joe’s enthusiasm to travel west and asked if he could go along. Although, Uncle JoJo was at least 10 years senior to Joe Jost, there was never a question of who took care of whom. Joe was clearheaded and exuded self-assurance; plus, he was a strong personality and just plain fun.

After he landed in New York, Joe got a job as a barber, but he always had the wanderlust.

Even in his old homeland he took many trips, usually on a bicycle, exploring the picturesque countryside. (His favorite trip was to Vienna to see the opera.)

He was excited to see the rest of the U.S. His method of operation was to get established in a place, then send for his uncle JoJo. The first thing he did when he arrived in a new town was buy a freshly-starched collar, clean up, and go get a job. Joe scouted barber shops with the best clientele and told his daughter Pat, "I always got a job immediately."

Not to get too far off the subject, but I was in a local specialty shop a few weeks ago when in walked a couple in their late teens dressed in beach attire and reeking of suntan lotion. I could hardly believe my ears when the girl approached the salesman and asked for a job application.

I said to him on the side, "She’s got to be kidding. Does she seriously think she’ll get hired, dressed like that, with her boyfriend in tow?"I might add I know it’s the style, but the boyfriend was wearing those now popular, ever-so-attractive size-40 clown shorts clinched below his 28-inch waist.

Perhaps, Joe Jost could have given them some helpful advice on dressing to get the job.

Joe worked his was westward, venturing from New York to Chicago to Denver. He eventually wound up in Upland, California where he met his future wife, Edith McKean. With each city, Uncle JoJo followed up the trail.

Yearning to see the world, Joe hopped a Spreckles freighter bound for Australia. Stopping off in the island paradise of Hawaii, he was the first blonde curly-haired man to be presented to the Queen of Hawaii. Traveling on to Australia, where he arrived with only a $5 gold piece, Joe quickly landed a job.

By the time Joe set foot in New Zealand he wired Uncle JoJo, who was still stateside, for some money. What he received was a one way non-refundable ticket back to the U.S., which ended his intended world tour. Apparently, Uncle JoJo knew he would have kept on the move.

After returning to Upland, Joe married Edith in June 1917. He worked as an insurance agent for a short time, but then enlisted in the Army. During World War I, he drove a supply wagon and served as an infantry foot soldier in Europe. After an honorable discharge, Joe went back to Upland and dabbled in the insurance business once more.

But in 1920, Joe truly found his niche when he opened up a place of his own. Unknown to many the original Joe Jost’s was located on Main Street, Balboa Peninsula in Newport Beach. He sold candy, ice cream and cigarettes, along with other sundry items and Eastside Near Beer. For the gamesmen, billiards and poker were played in the back.

In 1924, Joe sold his Balboa location and moved to Long Beach. He established Joe Jost’s on Anaheim Street as a combination barber shop/pool and poker emporium.

Various sundry items continued to be sold: corn cob pipes, razor blades, headache remedies, etc. When prohibition was repealed, Joe started to serve cold beer in addition to some sandwiches. Hence, the beloved "Special" was invented along with Joe’s pickled eggs.

During that time he also sold fresh eggs and slab bacon to go. Soon thereafter, the Barbering Commission informed Joe that it was much too dangerous to cut hair where alcohol was served and consumed. So, out went the barber chairs and in went the now-old initial engraved booths.

Joe was a tenacious worker and managed to cut costs during the Depression years by using his business savvy. Electricity costs were high, so he turned the lights off and turned them on again when he heard potential customers in approaching traffic.

As the years passed, Joe Jost, Jr. became a partner at "the store". This title, given by Edith, a proper teetotaler, referred to the family business. Joe was able to take even more time off having Joe Jr. in charge in his absence (of course, there were some squabbles about the rearrangement of the bread stock and other condiments). But Joe had a passion for camping and fly-fishing. He would take long trips for 2-3 months at a time.

In spite of his great love for people, Joe cherished his solitude. For the first few weeks he enjoyed setting up camp and being alone. After that time all friends and family were welcomed. He also acquired the nickname "Sierra Joe." It seems an appropriate name since he had a pure reverence for all animals, nature and the beauty of the stars.

One of his favorite camp haunts was Witchipec, where he bestowed gifts or jewelry to the Hoopa Indians. They reassembled the stones and gems into other beadwork or used the pieces to adorn their clothing.

Joe spent his retired years first in Desert Hot Springs. There he learned to ride dirt bikes and spent a lot of his time swimming and taking saunas. He also fed the coyotes. His daughter Pat said, "My Daddy wasn’t afraid of anything."

When he quit driving, he moved to Leisure World in Seal Beach. There he played billiards and cards and attended all the dances (I forgot to mention on his Atlantic crossing he rode steerage but spent most of his nights on the upper decks, when the ladies found out what a fabulous dancer he was).

Of course, he made a lot of new friends with his magnetic personality and the mini-Joe Jost’s he set up his patio. Books and music were always very important to him. Forever an opera fan, he continued to listen to all kinds of music. The only novel he ever read was "The Old Man & the Sea."

So back to the cup of tea, "Who would it be?" Maybe not a famous person, but a family member. Perhaps a role model that is still here; the opportunity awaits you while there is time.

~ Cathleen Buck, 1994

Store Down for Maintenance

Thank you for your patience while we create our new and improved web store. Check back soon for all your favorite Joe Jost's apparel. 

Joe Jost's T-Shirts

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Attention Joe Jost's Pickled Egg Lovers!

Pickled Eggs Mix from Joe Jost's

 

Are you currently living in an area of the world that doesn’t allow you to make a quick visit to Joe’s but you hunger for one of our famous Pickled Eggs? Well over the years we have received many requests to ship our pickled eggs, but we resisted these requests due to the extreme expense involved. However we have solved that problem, with the help of a food scientist we have developed a dry powdered formula to duplicate our famous pickled eggs.

We provide the dry mix, you provide the eggs, jar and 40 gr. cider vinegar. Just follow the instructions and in just 7 days you will be able to enjoy our pickled eggs. Make them for your own use or send one to a friend or relative as a gift. Click here to place your order now.

 

Press Telegram Article about Pickled-Eggs Kit
Modern miracles: The Apple Watch and the Joe Jost pickled-egg kit
 
 
Joe Jost’s Tavern is located at 2803 East Anaheim Street, Long Beach, CA 90804 USA
Monday-Saturday: 10am-11pm • Sunday: 10am-9pm • Phone: 562-439-5446
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